Author Topic: Picture of the Day (Other eras)  (Read 800454 times)

Offline MaJ.P.Bouras

  • Masterspammer
  • ****
  • Posts: 3.210
  • A Hellenic version of Jackie Chan.
    • View Profile
Re: Picture of the Day (Other eras)
« Reply #1410 on: 13-07-2010, 16:07:56 »


Greek helmet with swastika marks on the top part (details), 350-325 BCE from Taranto, found at Herculanum. Cabinet des Médailles, Paris.
Enlarge
Greek helmet with swastika marks on the top part (details), 350-325 BCE from Taranto, found at Herculanum. Cabinet des Médailles, Paris.

Quote
While commonly associated with Nazi Germany, the swastika symbol is more than 3,000 years old. The term "Swastika" was originally the name for a hooked cross in Sanskrit, and swastikas have been found on artifacts, such as coins and pottery, from the ancient city of Troy.

Not only are swastikas associated with ancient Troy, the symbols are found in many other cultures, such as Chinese, Japanese, Indian and southern European. By the Middle Ages, the swastika was a well-known symbol and had many different names, depending on the country. In some cultures, such as in ancient China, the symbol is turned counterclockwise (sauvastika).

Throughout its history, the swastika represented life, sun, power, strength and good luck. In the early 20th century, it was still considered a positive symbol. During World War I, it was found on shoulder patches of members of the American 45th Division and the Finnish air force. Only after the Nazi period did its connotation change.

German nationalists chose to use the swastika in the mid-19th century because it was associated with the Aryan race and Germanic history. At the end of the 19th century, German nationalists used the symbol on periodicals and for the official emblem of the German Gymnasts’ League. By the 20th century, it was a common symbol used in Germany to represent German nationalism and pride, for example, as the emblem for the Wandervogel, a German youth group. Swastikas also were used, however, in anti-Semitic periodicals.

The swastika officially became the emblem for the Nazi Party on August, 7, 1920, at the Salzburg Congress. Describing the new flag in Mein Kampf, Hitler said the swastika symbolized the victory of the Aryan man.

Today the symbol is most commonly associated with Nazi Germany, the Holocaust, neo-Nazis and other hate groups.

Overview

The Swastika has an extensive history. The motif seems to have first been used in Neolithic Eurasia. The swastika is used in religious and civil ceremonies in India. Most Indian temples, entrance of houses, weddings, festivals and celebrations are decorated with swastikas. The symbol was introduced to Southeast Asia by Hindu kings and remains an integral part of Balinese Hinduism to this day, and it is a common sight in Indonesia. The symbol has an ancient history in Europe, appearing on artifacts from pre-Christian European cultures. It was also adopted independently by several Native American cultures.


In the Western world, the symbol experienced a resurgence following the archaeological work in the late nineteenth century of Heinrich Schliemann, who discovered the symbol in the site of ancient Troy and associated it with the ancient migrations of Proto-Indo-Europeans ("Aryan" people). He connected it with similar shapes found on ancient pots in Germany, and theorised that the swastika was a "significant religious symbol of our remote ancestors," linking Germanic, Greek and Indo-Iranian cultures. By the early 20th century it was widely used worldwide and was regarded as a symbol of good luck and auspiciousness.

The work of Schliemann soon became intertwined with the völkisch movements, for which the swastika was a symbol of "Aryan" identity, a concept that came to be equated by theorists like Alfred Rosenberg with a Nordic master race originating in northern Europe. Since its adoption by the Nazi Party of Adolf Hitler, the swastika has been associated with fascism, racism (white supremacy), World War II, and the Holocaust in much of the West. The swastika remains a core symbol of Neo-Nazi groups, and is also regularly used by activist groups to signify the supposed Nazi-like behaviour of organizations and individuals they oppose.

Offline Tolga<3

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1.285
  • (No longer) terrorizing terrorists. :<
    • View Profile
Re: Picture of the Day (Other eras)
« Reply #1411 on: 13-07-2010, 21:07:48 »
Epilepsy is bad.

Offline Paasky

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1.801
  • DON'T PANIC! DON'T PANIC!
    • View Profile
Re: Picture of the Day (Other eras)
« Reply #1412 on: 13-07-2010, 21:07:28 »
Note the swastika is nothing like the nazi one.
It's half naked people on boats. That's all.
Here in Finland we call that "summer".

Offline MaJ.P.Bouras

  • Masterspammer
  • ****
  • Posts: 3.210
  • A Hellenic version of Jackie Chan.
    • View Profile
Re: Picture of the Day (Other eras)
« Reply #1413 on: 13-07-2010, 21:07:31 »

Offline Graf_Radetzky(CZ)

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 769
    • View Profile
Re: Picture of the Day (Other eras)
« Reply #1414 on: 14-07-2010, 11:07:18 »

Offline G.Drew

  • FH-Betatester
  • ***
  • Posts: 1.627
  • FH player since 0.65
    • View Profile
Re: Picture of the Day (Other eras)
« Reply #1415 on: 14-07-2010, 15:07:08 »
Officer checking his watch = not good.
"Accept the challenges so that you may feel the exhilaration of victory" - Gen. George S. Patton
-you aren't allowed to have nice things.

Offline Invincible

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 639
  • Armyyyyarrrrrr!
    • View Profile
    • Javelin Photos
Re: Picture of the Day (Other eras)
« Reply #1416 on: 15-07-2010, 01:07:34 »

Vigen lovee.

wallpaper bonus:
http://img704.imageshack.us/img704/7195/grippens3.png
Grippen loveee
"If I advance, follow me. If I stop, urge me on. If I retreat, kill me."

Offline MaJ.P.Bouras

  • Masterspammer
  • ****
  • Posts: 3.210
  • A Hellenic version of Jackie Chan.
    • View Profile
Re: Picture of the Day (Other eras)
« Reply #1417 on: 15-07-2010, 01:07:18 »


Draken is better :D

Offline Roden

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 214
  • Make war not love
    • View Profile
Re: Picture of the Day (Other eras)
« Reply #1418 on: 15-07-2010, 01:07:21 »

Saab 37 Viggen 'nuff said

Offline [WDW]Megaraptor

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 1.081
    • View Profile
Re: Picture of the Day (Other eras)
« Reply #1419 on: 15-07-2010, 02:07:38 »
The Viggen has an amazing ability to look awesome from above and hideously ugly from below.

Offline THeTA0123

  • The north remembers
  • Masterspammer
  • ****
  • Posts: 16.841
    • View Profile
Re: Picture of the Day (Other eras)
« Reply #1420 on: 15-07-2010, 10:07:15 »


Why forget the Lansen?
-i am fairly sure that if they took porn off the internet, there would only be one website left and it would be called bring back the porn "Perry cox, Scrubs.

Offline Rataxes

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 207
    • View Profile
Re: Picture of the Day (Other eras)
« Reply #1421 on: 15-07-2010, 23:07:01 »


And Tunnan :D

My grandfathers brother flew J32 Lansen

Offline Zeno

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1.154
    • View Profile
Re: Picture of the Day (Other eras)
« Reply #1422 on: 16-07-2010, 02:07:22 »


And Tunnan :D

My grandfathers brother flew J32 Lansen

the tiny jet from bf1942 anyone? ;D

Offline [130.Pz]S.Tiemann

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 489
  • FH-Betatester
    • View Profile
Re: Picture of the Day (Other eras)
« Reply #1423 on: 16-07-2010, 06:07:33 »


Quote
A McDonnell-Douglas CF-18 fighter aircraft during a test of the Canadian-made CRV-7 unguided air-to-ground missile by the Aerospace Engineering and Test Establishment in 1985. The CF-18 came into Canadian Forces service in 1982. (DND, 85-921)

The CRV7 is a 2.75 inch (70 mm) folding-fin ground attack rocket produced by Bristol Aerospace in Winnipeg, Manitoba. When it was first introduced in the early 1970s it was the highest performing 2.75 inch rocket (the standard US size) in the world, the first with enough energy to penetrate standard Warsaw Pact aircraft hangars. The CRV7 remains the most powerful rocket to this day, and has slowly become the de-facto  standard for Western-aligned forces, at least outside the United States.

Offline Graf_Radetzky(CZ)

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 769
    • View Profile
Re: Picture of the Day (Other eras)
« Reply #1424 on: 16-07-2010, 09:07:32 »
1917. Officers and NCOs compare the MG08/15 and the British Lewis Gun