Author Topic: Revolting Uniting  (Read 265685 times)

Offline Zoologic

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Re: Revolting Uniting
« Reply #6390 on: 13-04-2016, 05:04:23 »
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-36027752

Sums up Russian media reputation. Somehow, it is better not to comment. But this is beyond stupid. They treat public relation as monkey business. Well, don't blame the public perception if your legitimacy is on par with monkey business.

Offline Sgt.KAR98

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Re: Revolting Uniting
« Reply #6391 on: 19-04-2016, 05:04:39 »
Yesterday was the most bizarre day ever in brazilian history.




Offline Captain Pyjama Shark

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Re: Revolting Uniting
« Reply #6392 on: 19-04-2016, 16:04:13 »
More so than Germany's semi-final solution?  ;D

Offline Slayer

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Re: Revolting Uniting
« Reply #6393 on: 21-04-2016, 20:04:53 »
Death toll among artists is particularly high this year: it's Prince this time.

http://www.tmz.com/2016/04/21/prince-dead-at-57/

Offline siben

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Re: Revolting Uniting
« Reply #6394 on: 22-04-2016, 20:04:43 »
Bought myself a Russian 1950 made Siminov SKS-45. Bought my girlfriend a vietnam era PLA uniform (she is Asian). Tried to get some pictures taken with her, she does not approve. She isn't a big fan of China.

Offline Zoologic

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Re: Revolting Uniting
« Reply #6395 on: 23-04-2016, 05:04:27 »
Where did she came from (or ethnicity, if she is Belgian)?

Offline siben

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Re: Revolting Uniting
« Reply #6396 on: 23-04-2016, 08:04:20 »
Where did she came from (or ethnicity, if she is Belgian)?
Belgian she is, Philippina she was. Bacolod area she was born.

Offline Zoologic

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Re: Revolting Uniting
« Reply #6397 on: 23-04-2016, 12:04:31 »
Ah no wonder she dislikes it. Perhaps she will like American stuff.

Offline IrishReloaded

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Re: Revolting Uniting
« Reply #6398 on: 25-04-2016, 09:04:55 »
Guess this one goes right to our friends in Suomi :)

Met a nice girl from Finnland, going to visit her in late may :)

Time to learn at least some words in finnish - anyone up to help me :D ?

Offline Flippy Warbear

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Re: Revolting Uniting
« Reply #6399 on: 25-04-2016, 09:04:29 »
Perkele - all you need to survive here.

Offline IrishReloaded

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Re: Revolting Uniting
« Reply #6400 on: 25-04-2016, 09:04:05 »
:D going to say that after bed time to her XD guess shes gonna to be very pleased :D

Offline Kalkalash

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Re: Revolting Uniting
« Reply #6401 on: 25-04-2016, 11:04:58 »
:D going to say that after bed time to her XD guess shes gonna to be very pleased :D
A full guide:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ek9y6QwRtg0
“Think of how stupid the average person is, and realize half of them are stupider than that.” - George Carlin

Offline Kelmola

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Re: Revolting Uniting
« Reply #6402 on: 25-04-2016, 15:04:58 »
Guess this one goes right to our friends in Suomi :)

Met a nice girl from Finnland, going to visit her in late may :)

Time to learn at least some words in finnish - anyone up to help me :D ?
FH2 Finland meet tiem?

Here goes. Do remember that Finnish is pronounced "literally" and intonation is only present in stage play. Book Finnish ("kirjakieli") is used in formal speeches, semi-formal Finnish ("yleiskieli") omitting some words and suffixes when trying to sound professional, and spoken Finnish ("puhekieli") in almost any other situation. Difference between spoken and book Finnish is much greater than in English. Pronouns and most common verbs sound completely different in Western and Eastern dialects, and in the Helsinki region people use them interchangeably... (Be grateful that nobody speaks the old Helsinki dialect, "Stadin slangi", anymore - it was a pidgin language of Finnish, Swedish, Russian, Estonian, German, Dutch, English, and Yiddish.)

olut = (a) beer
kalja, bisse, keppana, gepardi, keskiketterä = informal names for beer (specifically the <=4,7% variant that you can get from grocery stores)
tuoppi = a pint (going to a bar, you can just say "tuoppi" so you will get a pint of whatever is the cheapest 4,7% lager on tap)
mäyräkoira, mäyris = a 12-pack of beer (mäyräkoira = dachshund, you can guess why it's so named)
siideri, sidukka = cider (formal/informal)
lonkero = literal translation would be "tentacle" but refers to a long drink, specifically the local gin/grapefruit lemonade alcopop, or any alcopop (beware, due to Czarist-era legislation the grocery stores are allowed to sell only fermented, not distilled drinks, so their variety of lonkero is just as awful as you might imagine).
brändylonkero = another local alcopop variant, this time mixing brandy with apple/grape lemonade. It was literally so good-tasting that the nanny state banned it for decades.
viina = liquor (often understood as vodka, though)
jaloviina = literally: "noble liquor", ready-bottled local mix of the cheapest possible vodka and the cheapest possible brandy (every star in the rating equals to 25% brandy, so three-star is 75% brandy, 25% vodka)
kossu = Koskenkorva vodka
kossumäyräkoira, kossumäyris = 12x0,5 litre pack of vodka (not necessarily Koskenkorva)
salmari = (from official Salmiakki Koskenkorva) any vodka mixed with salted licorice, can be bought readily bottled
Virtanen = a shot of vodka mixed to energy drink (Virtanen is the most common surname in Finnish, but "virta" means a stream (as in river) or electric current, and since the first local energy drink brand was called Battery...)
punaviini, valkoviini = red wine, white wine
kuohuviini, kuohari = sparkling wine (formal, informal)
hanapakkaus = wine carton with a tap

kyllä = yes
kyllä kulta = yes, darling (you may will need this a lot)
ei = no
kiitos (formal), kiitti (informal) = thank you, thanks
kyllä kiitos, ei kiitos = yes please, no thank you (we only have one word for thanks, no positive/negative split)
anteeksi (formal), sori (sic, informal) = sorry (heh)
ole hyvä = here you are
(hyvää) huomenta = good morning (by including the "hyvää" it becomes more formal)
(hyvää) päivää = good day (quite formal)
(hyvää) iltaa = good evening (quite formal)
hyvää yötä = good night (Finns never say this to strange people so is not formal even though it sounds like the above more formal expressions)
näkemiin = goodbye
hei / moi = hello or bye, depending on context

And since you're meeting a nice Finnish girl, here's some useful phrases:
Minä pidän sinusta = I like you
Minä rakastan sinua = I love you
Since Finnish is all about 15 cases for nouns expressed with suffixes, here's a nice subtly different pair of phrases:
Minä haluan sinut = I want you (as my own)
Minä haluan sinua = I want (to have sex with) you

Of course, you probably already know from the countless memes that "vittu" can be used to replace nearly any swearword (it literally translates to "cunt" but is most often used as "fuck" is used in English), and to express nearly every emotion possible, and is used as both an interjection and punctuation mark by the teenagers and white trash.

Anyone under 50 understands English more or less, and a sizable percentage of the older people too, but may not speak it very well, so you may need to ask when in strange company:
Puhutko englantia? = Do you speak English? (informal; if s/he is under 50)
Puhutteko englantia? = Do you speak English? (formal; if they're elderly; the old people still appreciate T/V distinction present here)
PUHUTSÄ VITTU ENGLANTIA? = ENGLISH MOTHERFUCKER, DO YOU SPEAK IT? (if s/he is still in school)
« Last Edit: 25-04-2016, 23:04:29 by Kelmola »

Offline Zoologic

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Re: Revolting Uniting
« Reply #6403 on: 25-04-2016, 16:04:01 »
Kelmola, it will be nice to give us approximation of how to say it using English phrases. I know perkele is read like how we pronounce it, thanks to German phonetics we use down here (except the reversed v and w). But to English speakers, perkele will be like: per from "super", ke from "kennedy", le from "lemmings".

Besides Perkele, I know "Voi Vittu" as another Finnish swear words. Which makes me kinda proud. Like I know "chert" instead of just suka and blyat in Russian. Other than that, it is FH1's voice command like "eteenpäiiiinnn!!!""

Glad to know that it is not just Javanese, Japanese, and Mandarin that has this silly extra vocabularies level. So we have: "rude" (among thugs or closest friends, used to communicate to slaves - also the most popular form today), "casual", "equal" (among friends / classmates), "formal", "respectful" (to parents, teacher, older sibling), "high formal" (to royalties, diplomatic).

Offline IrishReloaded

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Re: Revolting Uniting
« Reply #6404 on: 25-04-2016, 18:04:47 »
Kiitos Kelmola!

Very kind from you to write such a long post!
And there were some really helpfull words as well as phrases inside, which Ill definatly use - going for the "PUHUTSÄ VITTU ENGLANTIA" at the airport, in order not to miss my connection flight from Helsinki to Kuopio :D


Do Finns know any differenation or "stages" of the phrase " Minä rakastan sinua " ?
Because in german there is, and it makes a big difference . There are like 2 stages
1. Stage : Ich habe dich lieb - may be translate to "I am in love with you "
2. Stage : Ich liebe dich " I love you "
but actually you would never say the 2nd one first - because there is kinda a big difference in the "love - level" between those two.

So is it ok to use the minä rakastan sinua ?

Kiitos, hyvää ilta !